Menu

Issues of Food Access and Food Insecurity in the United States: Causes, Effects, and Implications Associated with Minority Populations

Elizabeth Roderick

May 2020


This paper explores recent literature on food access in the United States and describes the parameters of food insecurity through the lens of equity and social justice.  It highlights the disparity that people of color confront in the system responsible for cultivating, sustaining, regulating, and distributing the nation’s food supply. The paper concludes with a brief review of initiatives to date to address these issues and discusses food system reform strategies.

Issues of Food Access and Food Insecurity in the United States

 

 


Urban Commercial Revitalization graduate class, Fall 2019: Shacklefords Commercial Development Analysis, Prepared for King and Queen County, Virginia

May 2020

Chole Rote, Charlie Wilson, Will Wilson, Vegas Krane, Hunter Wood, Eric Mai


King and Queen is a rural county located on the eastern rim of the Richmond-Petersburg MSA.  The County asked the Urban Commercial Revitalization class to recommend development concepts anchored by retail food for a particular location – the intersection of Route 33 and The Trail at Shacklefords.  This report describes four alternative development scenarios, each of which is anchored by a retail food outlet, for the Shacklefords site. The recommendations are based on analyses of unmet consumer demand derived from geostatistical analysis and customer intercept surveys, as well as on the profiles of 13 retail food supply outlets, which are described in detail in an accompanying report.

Shacklefords Commercial Development Analysis

 

 


Food Access in Petersburg, Virginia: Final Report and Recommendations, Prepared for the City of Petersburg, Virginia

May 2020

Logan Ashby, Chelsey de Leon, Shekinah Mitchell, Michael Nixon-Garrison, Gabriella Pino-Moreno, Elizabeth Roderick, Jeff Smith


The City of Petersburg is an historic city located 25 miles south of Richmond.  The City asked the Urban Commercial Revitalization class to make recommendations for ways to increase and improve retail food options in low-wealth neighborhoods in the northern and eastern parts of the city.  Using surveys, geo-spatial analytic techniques and other methods the class estimated unmet consumer demand.  The class also created 13 profiles of retail food supply outlets, described in an accompanying report.  Based on these insights the class made several recommendations of alternative ways to improve access to food for Petersburg’s neighborhoods.

Food Access in Petersburg_Virginia

 

 


Urban Commercial Revitalization graduate class, Fall 2019: Increasing Access to Food: A Comprehensive Report on Food Supply Options

May 2020

Logan Ashby, Chesley De Leon, Vegas Krane, Eric Mai, Shekinah Mitchell, Michael Nixon-Garrison, Gabriella Pino-Moreno, Elizabeth Roderick, Chole Rote, Jeff Smith, Charlie Wilson, Will Wilson, Hunter Wood


This report describes 13 retail food supply options that developers and local governments can consider when seeking to improve access to retail food options in neighborhoods and communities.  These range from big-box supermarkets, to small independent grocery stores, to food banks, cooperatives, and mobile markets.  For each of the 13 types of suppliers, the report includes descriptions of the organization and operation of the retail establishment, its typical locations, and specific cases of success and failure, as well as the lessons learned for future practice. 

Increasing Access to Food_A Comprehensive Report on Food Supply Options